Newsletter for our Neighbours

Greetings, neighbors of Aongatete Forest. This is the first of more regular newsletters from us, to keep you informed about our activities. Pest Levels We regularly measure the pest levels in the Forest. Monitoring done in early February shows that OUTSIDE the controlled area, our traps showed a 65% incidence of rats, compared to 8% within our controlled area. In one part of our forest where we have recently deployed 50 or so Good Nature traps, our rat indice is now 0%. Possum levels out...
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Let’s Count Kereru while we put out our rat baits

The Great Kereru Count coincides with our Baiting Day on 30 Sept. You can all help to get an idea of how many kereru we have at Aongatete by keeping a tally of the number of bird you see and hear along you way. We will collate the total back at the kohanga. Spring is such a wonderful time to see our amazing native birds at Aongatete. If you would like to help control rats and count kereru visit our website www.aongateteforest.org/volunteer-page/  
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Cheeky robins a measure of forest’s health

The forest at Aongatete is now alive with birds after 12 years of pest control and soon 20 volunteers are going to prove it. A count of North Island robin will take place in the forest on Sunday, 30 July, organized by the Aongatete Forest Project. “Robins are cute, engaging, cheeky birds,” says project chair Barbara McGillivray, “and they’re also a good indicator that the forest is coming alive again. “When I first started volunteering for pest control in 2007 if we heard just one r...
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May 2017 – Tracking tunnels and discovering geckos

You have to be lucky to see a native gecko in the forest. The little lizards are rare because rats, cats, dogs, stoats, pigs and possums eat them. So it was a red letter day four years ago when a volunteer putting out rat bait came face to face with a gecko. It was a brown and grey forest gecko, an endemic species, which means it is native only to NZ. Then two years ago on a guided walk led by the Aongatete Trust an observant participant saw a green gecko, just as another walker trod on i...
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